Sleepless

Anne Demetroules, School Page Editor

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How often do you say ‘you’re tired’ or that you want to go back to bed? A lot, right? More often than not you’ll find a teenager who’s said that a handful of times throughout the school day. A typical high school student needs around eight to ten hours of sleep every night. On average, they usually get between seven or eight hours, according to nationwidechildrens.org.  Junior Seana Morgan said, “ I like sleep, I usually get a solid seven and a half hours.” When asked if school should begin at a later time, most students would probably yes. Junior Deirdre Dunkin was asked if she thought school should begin at a later time, she responded with, “Yes, it should start later because our brains start to work later at like 9 a.m. so we don’t get a lot of work done during our morning classes.” In the article  Sleep For Teenagers (nationwidechildrens.org), it stated that not having enough sleep can have its consequences, “…not getting enough sleep can limit your ability to learn, listen, concentrate, and solve problems. You may even forget important information like names, numbers, your homework, or a date with a special person in your life.”

But then again, there could the occasional student who disagrees with this notion that school should begin later. There is a multitude of students that participate in sports or other after school activities in our school.  If school started later, there would be the possibility that sports would begin later in the day and teams would have less time to practice. Activities could even run late into the evening giving students less time to work on homework, study, or spend time with their family and friends, which are all vital parts to a healthy student life.

There’s also the question that if school started later would it still end at the same time? This would be in consideration but a problem would arise where the shortened school day would most likely cut down on class time giving teachers less time to do their jobs and help students learn. Although students may like the idea of shortened periods, in the long run would it really be beneficial?

Another factor that goes along with sleep patterns in teens is what kind of person they are. If they’re a morning person or “early birds,” meaning that they wake up early and go to bed earlier, or if they are night people, the ones who stay up late or also sometimes referred to as “night owls,” practically the opposite of a morning person, can affect how they function. Senior Olivia Dicostanzo said, “Sleep definitely affects me during school, I’m exhausted by lunch and ready for a nap. I’m probably a morning person, but by the time I get up for school it’s just too early for me.”  Most teens in school right now would probably be classified as “night owls” due to the excess amount of homework that some get, after school activities, and even jobs that many may have. All these activities can affect their sleep patterns and how they function during school. Junior Adriana Montgomery gave her insight on this, stating, “I think sleep is one of  the most important things in a student’s life. Personally, I usually stay up late because I get home late from work most of the time and start my homework later into the night. I like sleep, I feel like the more sleep I get the better I function. So having school start so early in the morning I feel like I’m not fully awake and ready for the day until after lunch.”  In the article Sleep for Teenagers, it said that “it’s natural to not be able to fall asleep before 11:00p.m.”  If students don’t happen to get to bed and fall asleep until 11pm or later and have to wake up at 6am, they’re definitely not getting the needed amount of rest to properly function during the school day. This could result in students being extremely drowsy during class and not being fully immersed in the learning process. This could produce a student who doesn’t entirely understand the curriculum and evidently not living up to their full potential, affecting their grades. Senior Brendan Hallinan stated, “Not getting enough sleep makes it hard for students to give their focus to a class and makes it difficult to learn new things which, in turn, can negatively affect your schooling experience.”

Sleep is an issue that students are faced with everyday. It might not seem like a big deal but there are consequences that go along with being sleep deprived. Some consequences could be eating too much or eating unhealthy foods that lead to weight gain which could make you prone to getting more acne or other skin problems, most importantly, you could be driving drowsy which puts you and others at risk according to sleepfoundation.org.

There are ways to fix this big issue. Maybe school could start later or maybe students could start to go to bed earlier but most people can agree that sleep affects the way students function and learn in school and how they go about their daily lives.

Senior Brendan Hallinan stated, “Not getting enough sleep makes it hard for students to give their focus to a class and makes it difficult to learn new things which, in turn, can negatively affect your schooling experience.”

Sleep is an issue that students are faced with everyday. It might not seem like a big deal but there are consequences that go along with being sleep deprived. Some consequences could be eating too much or eating unhealthy foods that lead to weight gain which could make you prone to getting more acne or other skin problems, most importantly, you could be driving drowsy which puts you and others at risk according to sleepfoundation.org.

There are ways to fix this big issue. Maybe school could start later or maybe students could start to go to bed earlier but most people can agree that sleep affects the way students function and learn in school and how they go about their daily lives. 

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Sleepless